Hip and Knee Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis (OA) refers to the gradual ‘wear and tear’ of a joint over time, resulting in the breakdown of cartilage cushioning the joint and decrease in joint space.

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Osteophytes (bony growths) can develop, and the joint capsule may become inflamed. It is common in the hip and knee joints as they weight-bear a lot of the bodies load.

Background

Your Physio may refer you to an orthopaedic surgeon to discuss whether a joint replacement is appropriate. In the case of surgery, both prehab and rehab is hugely important and the Clinical Pilates studio is a great setting for this.

Symptoms

  • Hip OA – gradual onset of hip, groin, thigh or buttock pain – along with stiffness of the hip joint.
  • Knee OA – gradual onset of knee pain, and stiffness of the knee joint.
  • Pain is usually flared up with increased weight-bearing or load (lots of walking or squats), and is particularly stiff/achey in the morning. Pain at night may also be present.

Care

  • Your physiotherapist will educate you on what you should do or avoid. This involves keeping active with low load exercise (Pool/hydrotherapy is excellent, along with Clinical Pilates). Other suggestions include pacing your activities (may need to break of certain activities with rests in excellent, along with Clinical Pilates). Other suggestions include pacing your activities (may need to break of certain activities with rests in between) and weight loss can reduce the load placed on your joints.
  • A Physio can also offer advice on how to manage pain – paracetamol, anti-inflammatories, heat.
  • Release of tight muscles in the area – either via massage or dry needling.
  • Hip or knee joint mobilisations to improve range of motion.

For more information, please download the below flyer.